LEARN ABOUT CHRONIC CONSTIPATION

Exercising and changing your diet can help with constipation symptoms. Over-the-counter treatments like laxatives may also help. But if your constipation keeps coming back, it could be a medical condition that may need a prescription treatment.

Take the first step by talking to your doctor about your symptoms. While you might feel uncomfortable discussing such a personal issue, your openness will help your doctor find a treatment plan that’s right for you.

 
Which type of chronic constipation would you like to learn about first?
Two quick questions can help inform a discussion with your doctor.
  1. Do you take a prescription opioid medicine?
 

GET TO KNOW 3 TYPES OF CHRONIC CONSTIPATION

There are several different kinds of chronic constipation, and the right diagnosis from your doctor is key to finding a treatment plan that works. Below, you'll find information on 3 common types of chronic constipation. If you're not sure which type to learn about first, answering two quick questions above might help.

 

Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

If you have fewer than 3 bowel movements a week and difficulty passing stool, it may be a sign of a medical condition called Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC). “Idiopathic” means the cause of the constipation is unknown and not due to an underlying illness or medication. See 'Symptoms of CIC' for additional information.

See how AMITIZA can
help treat CIC in adults

Symptoms of CIC

The symptoms of CIC are different for everyone. Talk to your doctor if you have experienced the following for the last 3 months with symptoms starting at least 6 months ago:

  • 2 or more of the following symptoms:
    • Straining during bowel movements
    • Lumpy or hard stools
    • Feeling like your bowel is never completely empty
    • Feeling like your bowel is blocked
    • Fewer than 3 bowel movements per week
    • Need to manually pass a bowel movement
  • Loose stools are rarely present without the use of laxatives

This is not a complete list of symptoms. Your doctor can determine if you have CIC.

Track your chronic constipation
symptoms

What causes CIC?

As you eat, nutrients from your food are absorbed by your intestines and transported through your body. What remains is mostly waste and fluid. It's your colon's job to take care of getting rid of the waste and absorbing the fluid.

If the muscles in your colon move too slowly, or if the colon absorbs too much water, your stool may get hard and dry which can make having a bowel movement difficult.

Get more information
on managing CIC

“I feel like I have been dealing with chronic constipation for a very long time. It’s hard to remember a time in my adult life when I didn’t feel like I was dealing with constipation.”
- Susie

Individual results may vary.

Listen to Susie’s experience with CIC

Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation

Constipation may be a problem for people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. This condition is known as Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation, or IBS-C. Some symptoms of IBS-C include stomach (abdominal) pain, stomach (abdominal) discomfort, and hard stools. See 'Symptoms of IBS-C' for additional information.

See how AMITIZA can help
treat IBS-C in
women ≥ 18 years

Symptoms of IBS-C

The symptoms of IBS-C can be different for everyone. Talk to your doctor if you have experienced the following for the last 3 months with symptoms starting at least 6 months ago:

  • Reoccurring abdominal pain or discomfort at least 3 days a month in the past 3 months associated with 2 or more of the following:
    • Improvement with a bowel movement
    • Changes in the number of bowel movements
    • Changes in stool appearance
  • Hard or lumpy stools at least 25% of the time and loose or watery stools in less than 25% of bowel movements (without the use of anti-diarrhea medications or laxatives)

It’s important to describe your symptoms accurately to your doctor so they can make the correct diagnosis.

Track your chronic constipation
symptoms

What causes IBS-C?

While the causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) are unknown, researchers think that people who suffer from it may have a colon or large intestine that is particularly sensitive to certain food and stress "triggers."

Some common triggers may include:

  • Large meals
  • Certain medicines
  • Fatty or fried foods
  • Foods like wheat, rye, barley, chocolate, milk products, or alcohol
  • Caffeinated or carbonated drinks like colas, coffee, or tea
  • Stress, conflict, or other strong emotions

Get more information on managing
IBS-C

“I can’t believe I waited to talk to my doctor…it was pretty motivating to finally give my problem a name.”
- Suzanne

Individual results may vary.

Watch Suzanne’s
experience with
IBS-C

Opioid-Induced Constipation

Opioids are commonly prescribed to help alleviate pain. However, people taking opioids may develop constipation as a side effect, a condition called Opioid-Induced Constipation (OIC). See 'Symptoms of OIC' for additional information.

See how AMITIZA can help
treat OIC in adults with
chronic, non-cancer pain

Symptoms of OIC

Talk to your doctor if you've experienced the following symptoms while taking an opioid medication for chronic, non-cancer pain:

Less than 3 bowel movements per week, with at least 25% of bowel movements associated with one or more of the following:

  • Moderate to very severe straining
  • Hard to very hard stools
  • Feeling like your bowel is never completely empty

Your doctor can determine if you have OIC.

Track your chronic
constipation symptoms

What causes OIC?

Opioids are commonly prescribed to help reduce pain. However, opioid treatment may lead to constipation as a side effect. In fact, up to 40% of patients taking opioids experience this side effect.

Opioids target certain receptors in the body to help relieve pain. Opioids may also cause a decrease in:

  • Intestinal fluids
  • Intestinal movement (or transit)
  • The ability to pass stool

Get more information on
managing OIC

“I had no idea my opioid pain reliever was causing my chronic constipation.”

Individual results may vary.

Not an actual patient.

Talking to
your doctor

Discussing your symptoms may seem too personal—but chronic constipation symptoms can mean you have a medical condition, and talking about it with your doctor may help you get the treatment you need.

Get help starting the conversation

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Taking
AMITIZA

Find out what to expect when taking AMITIZA.

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Uses & Important Safety Information

AMITIZA is for CIC in adults, OIC in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain, and IBS-C in women ≥ 18 years. Effectiveness in patients taking methadone has not been established.

Important Safety Information

AMITIZA (lubiprostone) is not for everyone. If you know or suspect you have a bowel blockage, do not take AMITIZA. If you are unsure, your healthcare provider (HCP) should evaluate your condition before starting AMITIZA. You should not take AMITIZA if you have severe diarrhea.

Some patients taking AMITIZA may experience nausea or diarrhea. If nausea occurs, take AMITIZA with food and water, if it becomes severe, tell your HCP. If your diarrhea becomes severe, stop taking AMITIZA and tell your HCP.

Within an hour of taking AMITIZA, a sensation of chest tightness and shortness of breath may occur. These symptoms usually go away within three hours, but may recur with repeated use. Tell your HCP if you experience these symptoms.

The most common side effects of taking AMITIZA (24 mcg) twice daily are nausea, diarrhea, headache, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and gas for patients treated for CIC; nausea and diarrhea for patients treated for Opioid-Induced Constipation. The most common side effects of taking AMITIZA (8 mcg) twice daily for IBS-C are nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. These are not all the side effects associated with AMITIZA.

Tell your HCP if you are taking a diphenylheptane opioid (e.g. methadone).

AMITIZA has not been studied in pregnant women. Based on animal studies, AMITIZA may cause fetal harm. AMITIZA should only be used during pregnancy if the potential benefits justify the potential risk to the fetus. If you are pregnant or become pregnant while being treated with AMITIZA, talk to your HCP to evaluate the risks to the fetus. Tell your HCP if you are nursing and monitor infants for diarrhea.

Tell your HCP if you have liver problems.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Indication

AMITIZA (lubiprostone) 24 mcg capsules twice daily is approved to treat Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) in adults. “Idiopathic” means the cause of the constipation is unknown and not due to an underlying illness or medication. AMITIZA 24 mcg twice daily is also approved to treat constipation caused by opioids (OIC), a type of prescription pain medicine, in adults with chronic, non-cancer pain. The effectiveness of AMITIZA has not been established if you are taking a diphenylheptane opioid (e.g., methadone). AMITIZA 8 mcg capsules twice daily is approved to treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) in women 18 years of age and older.

Please click here for complete Prescribing Information.